Frequently Asked Questions

What is Reverse Osmosis (RO) ?
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Reverse Osmosis, also known as Hyper-filtration by the industry, represents state-of-the-art in water treatment technology. Reverse Osmosis (RO) was developed in the late 1950's under U.S. Government funding, as a method of desalinating sea water

 

Today, reverse osmosis has earned its name as the most effective method of water filtration. It filters water by squeezing water through a semi-permeable membrane, which is rated at 0.0001 micron (equals to 0.00000004 inch!).

 

Non-RO water filters typically use a single activated carbon cartridge to treat water. They are much less effective, and the pore size on these filter media are much bigger, generally 0.5 - 10 micron. They can filter out coarse particles, sediments and elements only up to their micron rating. Anything finer and most dissolved substances cannot be filtered out. As a result, water is far less clean and safe compared to reverse osmosis filtration

 

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What is the Process of RO Water

In a nutshell, the raw water is drawn from the national water supply (SYABAS), which has already been treated with a conventional technique of filtration. This water is then exerted under high pressure through the Reverse Osmosis machines, which contain semi-permeable membranes. The water then goes through seven semi-permeable membranes. As passing through each stage, the water goes from merely adequate, to clean, and finally arrives at 99% pure and clean drinking water. Despite having been screened by seven separate semi-permeable membranes, the water then goes the ozone process. The Ozone oxidizes in water and incinerates any bacteria, which may exist. It is then reduced to harmless oxygen, leaving nothing but a breath of fresh air in the water. The end result is pure water safe for human consumption.

Where can i find RO Water in a bottle. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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RO water can be found easily at your convenient stores, pharmacies, or restaurants. However, look out for ACQUA & taste the difference in our pure drinking water